Agreement Object

A rare type of chord that phonologically copies parts of the head instead of corresponding to a grammatical category. [4] For example in Bainouk: Swahili, like all other Bantu languages, has many substantive classes. In class, verbs must correspond to their subjects and objects, and adjectives to the subjects who qualify them. For example: Kitabu kimoja kitatosha (One book will suffice), Mchungwa mmoja utatosha (One orange tree will suffice), Chungwa moja litatosha (One orange will be enough). But the verbs of Have need coherence in a very specific construction: the past participation must correspond to the direct object if it precedes the verb. In substantive sentences, adjectives do not correspond to the noun, although pronouns do. z.B. a szép könyveitekkel “with your beautiful books” (“szép”: beautiful): The suffixes of the plural, possessive “tone” and big/lowercase “with” are marked only on the noun. Case agreement is not an essential feature of English (only personnel pronouns and pronouns that have casus marking). There is sometimes a concordance between these pronouns: compared to English, Latin is an example of a very volatile language. The consequences of the agreement are therefore as follows: another characteristic is concordance in participations that have different forms for different sexes: in Hungarian, verbs have a poly-personal agreement, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its (accusative) object.

There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). The very irregular verb to be is the only verb with more coherence than this one in the present tense. In English, defective verbs usually do not show a match for the person or number, they contain modal verbs: can, can, must, must, must, must, should, should, should. Spoken French always distinguishes the plural from the second person and the first person plural in formal language and from the rest of the present in all verbs in the first conjugation (Infinitive in -er) except . . .